Practice Facility Inspection Process

The Practice Inspection requirements and bylaws are in compliance with the Veterinarians Act.

Practice Facilities are inspected on a 5-year cycle. When it is time for a facility to be inspected, a CVBC practice facility inspector will be in touch with you to schedule an inspection. Once the inspection is complete, the inspector will forward all documents and notes to the CVBC office along with their recommendation for accreditation. With the inspector’s recommendation, the facility will be put on the agenda for the next Practice Facility Accreditation Committee (PFAC) meeting to be granted accreditation. Once granted, the CVBC office will mail an accreditation letter and certificate to the facility.

If the inspector notes deficiencies in the practice facility, they will not recommend it for accreditation. Instead, they will follow up to make sure deficiencies are addressed and when satisfied, will at that time recommend the facility for accreditation.

Unless the facility or practice moves, expands its scope of practice, or has a major renovation requiring a new inspection, the facility or practice will not need to be inspected more than once every 5 years unless deemed necessary by the PFAC.

A Designated Registrant whose facility or practice accreditation has been denied or cancelled by the PFAC may apply to Council to review the decision within 30 days of the negative accreditation. There is no fee for this request.

Practice Facility Inspection Fee

The fee for a Practice Facility Inspection is $850.00 + GST. This fee was arrived at to account for inspector travel expenses, administrative costs and inspector remuneration. The CVBC Office will send an invoice to the Designated Registrant following an inspection.

Inspection of Consultant and Locum Practices

Consulting Practice
A Consulting Practice is recognized in bylaws, Part 3 – Accreditation and Naming, “Definitions” as a veterinary practice in which a registrant provides veterinary services to other registrants or practice facilities, including on line, and does not have its own premise, structure, vehicle or facility. Consulting practices do not differ substantially from other “limited scope” practices in that they specifically choose to dramatically limit their practices to a very narrow description.  Such a practice falls under the mandate of the Practice Facilities Accreditation Committee (PFAC).

The nature of the practice inspection for a consulting practice will be determined by the nature services provided by the consulting practice. A consulting practice that provides services involving specialized equipment and instruments (such as surgical equipment, ultrasound equipment, endoscope, etc) must have those equipment and instruments inspected, as this cannot by reasonably nor objectively performed by the DR of that practice, nor is it the mandate of any Specialty Board. All consulting practices, regardless of nature/scope, must also be evaluated by a Practice Inspector to assess their medical records, library, etc. as any other limited scope practice is inspected.

Locum Practice
The word ‘Locum’ is defined in the bylaws, Part 3 – Accreditation and Naming, s. 3.1 (7), and means a registrant who provides veterinary services on a contract basis to another registrant, from or within an accredited practice facility. A locum veterinarian is merely an employee of the practice(s) at which they work and therefore not generally considered to be a practice for the purposes of practice inspection. Accordingly, their practice does not require a practice inspection. Nor does a registrant seeking to start a locum practice in their own name with conferred veterinary academic designation does not require market name authorization from the CVBC.